Going Small, Part 2 ~ Fuji X100s – A keeper, or do I throw it back?

I have found that with most cameras, and for that matter just about any gizmo, toy or tool, the dating phase is the best. You’re in love with how it looks & what it does and for the moment, those little things that aren’t quite right are not even on your radar screen. Once the buzz settles down, reality sets in….

Don’t get me wrong; the little Fuji X100s is still beautiful in my eyes. It’s that those “little annoyances” are becoming more of a big deal. Like a power switch that seems always to be getting bumped to the “on” position (funny how it never gets bumped to “off”) tied in with short lived batteries and a battery indicator that goes from 2/3rds full to dead in a handful of shots, has really gotten old. A lens hood that requires an adapter ring, removing the thread protection ring on the lens, and no way to secure a lens cap once the aforementioned hood is in place. I guess one person’s PITA can be seen as eccentric…..

Or how about the fact that you cannot use the top shutter speed with the lens wide open or even stopped down to f/5.6? Yes the leaf shutter lens is a double-edged sword, able to synchronize with flash at any speed, but cannot open the aperture diaphragm fully faster than 1/1000 of a second.

Please know that it is not all gloom and doom on my part. It is still a very sexy camera to use, quiet as a silenced ninja and produces lovely files. The JPEGs are some of the nicest I’ve ever seen produced in camera. So much so, I rarely ever shoot RAW files, and besides as I said in my previous posting, they’re HUGE! The one caveat to this I believe, is in going to print for display, where having the higher bit depth gives smoother rendition of tonality with better shadow and highlight detail.

The best use of this camera comes when one can take time and slow down their photography and become very deliberate with image creation. Its light weight and small form factor means one will never get tired of carrying it around, and it starts lots of conversations when others see it. There are some images included from a recent Sustainability Institute “ReThink Series” get together that were shot anywhere from ISO 400 to 6400 which showcases how nice the low light capability and in camera processing of the files.

I also thought it would be a great traveling companion on my motorcycle trip from the mountains of Colorado to Charleston, SC, with its size and light weight. It did pretty well, but I find myself most of the time wishing for a narrower angle of view like a “50mm perspective”. Perhaps a better test will be to take it with on a trip to Italy, where packing light and being stealthy in churches and museums. I guess I’d better start saving now!

So, is it the perfect camera for me? At this time, I’m still not sure. I am desirous to spend some time with both the Fuji X Pro 1 + 35mm 1.4 and the Olympus OM-D EM-5 to compare. More to come!

Noisette Monoliths

Noisette Monoliths

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Forgotten

Forgotten

Cooper River 1

Cooper River 1

Cooper River 2

Cooper River 2

Fisher Recycling

Fisher Recycling

Fisher Recycling

Fisher Recycling

Fisher Recycling

Fisher Recycling

Yes, it's a rubber chicken...

Yes, it’s a rubber chicken…

.... that hangs in the cockpit

…. that hangs in the cockpit

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My reward for a long flight & layover

My reward for a long flight & layover

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Sharon

Sharon

Sharon the beautiful

Sharon the beautiful

Best friend

Best friend

Noodle bowl, how I've missed thee!

Noodle bowl, how I’ve missed thee!

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My trusty steed

My trusty steed

Sharon the beautiful, part 2

Sharon the beautiful, part 2

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