The cost of doing business as a professional photographer…

Adrianne Killin

Another delightful (and favorite!) model; Adrianne Killin helping with a lighting test.

Lately I have had some interesting conversations when I’m at various business and networking events. After exchanging the usual pleasantries and asking the person that I’m talking with about what they do, invariably (at least most of the time!) the other person will ask me what I do for a living. I like to answer that I’m a problem solver for my clients and that I help make them and their product or service look their best. I do this through my photographic services and knowledge base.

The first question I’m asked is about what camera gear I use. I have found that the answer I give can have a polarizing effect, from “Oh, yes, those cameras are the best and they take great pictures!”, to “How come you don’t use a XXXXX camera? My dad / Mr. Professional / I used to have (you can fill in the blank) always uses an XXXXX and they take the BEST pictures!” The conversation can sometimes take a turn for the worst; with the other person deciding they will tell me what’s wrong with my gear and why brand XXXXX is so much better. What fun!

The second question I get, is why professional photography is so expensive (in their mind)? To them, a camera and a few lenses from Costco or Best Buy and we’re in business! Yes, it’s true, expensive gear a photographer does not make. But the gear we use are tools, just like any other professional. Most top end mechanics use Snap-on, SK or another top of the line tool set. They invest in their craft because they want to be able to do the job without having tool failures and when there is a failure the tool is guaranteed for life and is replaced. Unfortunately, even though we invest in the top of the line professional gear, it is not warranted for life (not even close). So we invest in servicing said gear. A shooting pro can invest tens of thousands of dollars in camera bodies, only to have them wear out or become obsolete in only a few years. At least lenses have a longer life span.

Professional lighting, lighting modifiers, grip (light stands, booms & support), camera supports (tripods, monopods, studio stands) and computers and their software all cost money. And speaking of computers and software, there is always another upgrade waiting in the wings thanks to planned obsolescence. There are things like memory cards, batteries, radio remotes and a whole host of other necessities for day to day photographic capture and production. What about utilities? Power, phone and internet access come to mind. Commercial versions of these cost considerably more than their household counterparts. What about the lease cost for a space? Travel costs, even when in town, like fuel, parking, etc.?

Then we get to the things that most people forget about; insurances, licenses, professional memberships, accountant and attorney. What about marketing and advertising? All of these things add up, and are not much different from any other “professional” business. So why do people think we as photographers should do our livelihood for cheap? Don’t we deserve to put a roof over our head? Send a child to school? Pay for health insurance? Take a vacation? But I digress…

Just the other day I wound up sending in a couple of camera bodies, a lens, two small flashes and a battery grip all for servicing. Thankfully the team at CPS (Canon Professional Services) takes really good care of me! They sent me out loaner gear and covered all of the FedEx shipping both ways, had my gear all repaired within a week and with our Platinum membership it all cost me less than a thousand dollars. Again, one more example of the cost of doing business, and a place I recommend not skimping!

I guess all this is to say, running a professional business or any business for that matter, has expenses and if that business is a specialty it can get quite expensive. Maybe take a look at it from the standpoint that you are investing in great photography rather than the cost of the service, and that way we professional photographers may invest in your product or service too!

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2 thoughts on “The cost of doing business as a professional photographer…

    • Well said Richard, and I see that some of those who responded didn’t get it as well. One person made the comment about the $500 wedding photographer still being in business, but I don’t think they were ever truly in business in the first place. They merely received money for taking snapshots. They never ran a business, paid taxes, etc. I usually don’t even try to reason with folks like that, as it is akin to wrestling with a pig. You get muddy and the pig enjoys it! 🙂

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